Training

Claustrophobia – Fear of enclosed spaces

Claustrophobia – Fear of enclosed spaces

Claustrophobia can come from an early childhood experience of being trapped in an enclosed space or another similar experience which then creates an on-going anxiety of enclosed spaces. The original trigger for this anxiety is not what is most important but rather to change the current way of thinking that creates the unhelpful anxiety. Of course what is described as “an enclosed space” can vary greatly from one person to another so it’s important to gather as much information as possible before the start of each session.

The claustrophobia is a direct result of a particular way of thinking. During each session we explore how to change these unhelpful thinking patterns to discover a more appropriate sense of ease in the situations that used to create the anxiety.

Typical problem areas for those who are claustrophobic

Being stuck in a room with no visible means of escape
Elevators (lifts) – this means climbing a lot of stairs!
Trains and Planes – they can’t get on one because they worry about having an anxiety attack
Cars (the feeling of being stuck in a car)
Hospital procedures including MRI scans

This fear can have a really detrimental effect on a person’s lifestyle. This often results in endless checking to see if there is a means of escape from “the enclosed space” Often the anticipation of being in an enclosed space is the biggest problem with this condition as a person can endlessly imagine what “could” or “might happen”

Treatment Options

I see clients in my Leeds and Manchester hypnotherapy clinics as well as conducting Skype sessions for those who are not able to travel to these locations. The Provocative Change Works approach contains a number of excellent tools that help with this issue. I used many of these skills during the numerous BBC sessions I conducted in 2006. I also released a DVD in the same year entitled “Provocative Change Works for Phobias” which included me working with Karen a long standing claustrophobic.